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joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
. but parole. within eight years he could be eligible. this person did america a favor by helping out our droops out of iraq and afghanistan, reporting the wars weren't going anywhere as well as the president wanted to us do be. just just like daniel in vietnam and he needs our thanks. >> you recognize size the other side of that as well. >> you couldn't run a government if people were allowed to make these jump little, if we have good internal systems for whistle blowing and a system where you could get off, make it a defense that it was in the public interest. >> thank you for being with us, the senior managing attorney at the certainty for constitutional right here in new york. good to talk to you. flesh. >> you are thanks for having me. >> wild fires burning in the west are now threatening a national treasure. in northern california, a 25 square mile fire is out of control nereo sim at this national park. more than 50 fires are threatening people and property across at least 10 western states, the national i want agency fire center is now at its highest state of alert. that has not ha
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
the baseballs, there might be no financial crisis. >>> meanwhile, somewhere in america, a deranged woman you probably worked with is now writing her first love letter to ariel castro in prison despite the fact he slut shamed his victims during sentence. we'll uncover the slut shaming from rush limbaugh to castro on tonight's f bomb. today is the birthday of the late jerry garcia, also the birthday of my favorite rapper, public enemy leader chuck d and coolio is 50. how did that happen? i mention the musical artists today because mtv has a birthday they launched on this date in 1981 when the letters in their logo stood for music television. they dropped the words music television in 2010 proving once and for all that mtv now stands for nothing. this is "viewpoint." >> john: good evening, friends, i'm john fuglesang. this is "viewpoint." white house officials and democrats in both houses screamed from the rooftops about how bad sequestration would be. after the g.o.p. rammed it through both houses and john boehner boasted he got 98% of what he wanted, republicans said and i'm paraphrasing here
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
veterans of america, represents nearly 200,000 people, many of whom are young vets. msnbc contributor bill briggs joins me now with his report on this. bill, we've talked so much about the suicide rate and the problems, though, that these vets cite, sadly, are things that you would think could be addressed by our government, including getting their benefits when they retire and some other things that can be taken care of for them. >> yeah, the backlog on benefit -- receiving their benefits is enormous. that's contributing to this problem and has been for several years. it's such a complex issue, and it involves so many realities of coming home from war, reintegrating with your family, reintegrating with your community, finding a job, substance abuse. it's a very complex issue that i think some experts are finally starting to get a handle on maybe what's triggering this spike. >> and what do they believe is the key component? and i feel terrible trying to minimize this to one thing because as you pointed out, it's a laundry list of things these men and women face. >> yeah, what's really int
that is estimated to create 50 permanent jobs. that is not a jobs p.m. eastern on america's news headquarters. have a great day, everybody. >>> allowing the keystone pipeline to built requires a finding that doing so would be in our nation's interest. our national interest will be served only if the project does not significantly exacerbate carbon solution. >> david: did we find out that the keystone pipeline is not a solution problem. there is a new record revealing that the proposal to expand it will not impact greenhouse gas emissions. steve york you say it makes it impossible for the president to justify delaying the project any longer. this president will try to come one a way to delay th thing. i would rather have oil going through pipelines than on trains and if investors are willing to finance it, go for it. good for us. less oil from venezuela. good all around. >> david: rick, the bottom line of the report, says if we don't do the pipeline we have to substitute the oil from venezuela, which is dirty oil. >> be careful here. that is absolutely true. what the report was talking about is carb
offered a chilling prediction for america that she calls inevitable. we will cover her less than an uplifting words. next. with centurylink as your trusted partner, our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and responsive, dedicated support, we constantly evolve to meet your needs. every day of the week. centurylink® your link to what's next. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is one take away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraced as secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also the first woman to hold the
napolitano offered a chilling prediction for america th she calls inevitable. inevitable. we will cover her@áh%h%k%k%k5 aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your goodriving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is oneake away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraceds secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also th
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
between black and white perceptions. he is the measure of the alienation of black america from white america so he knows if he is outrageous and people attack him there will be a tendency to support him because he is now being beleaguered by the very people who are being viewed as the people who are oppressing. he would make these outrageous comments and he would be attacked by everyone and he would come in town without a single bit of advertising and draw people to a rally because people were rallying around the attacked brother. it's much the same in the arab world. when saddam hussein was making bold and outrageous comments he was praying on the alienation and frustration and anger of people who feel that their histories out of control, that they are being beleaguered by the west, that they have no ability to shape their destiny. and so here's this guy standing up and defending him. james baker understood that. in 1991 he spoke before a congressional testimony and said why don't we do this and why do we do that? james baker said understand what saddam is doing is praying on arab a
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
in the region. this is something that is going to require america's attention, hopefully the entire international community's attention. >> senator john mccain came on "new day" very strong on this. he believes the u.s.'s credibility in the region has been hurt, that a situation like syria, that he believes, there's been delay, and it has led to a bolds by the regime there, that in egypt that what many believe is a coup wasn't called a coup. >> i am sympathetic to senator mccain's passion for helping people work through what is an extraordinarily difficult and heart-breaking situation, but what i think the american people also expect me to do as president is to think through what we do from the perspective what is in our long-term national interest. sometimes what we've seen is folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff that does not turn out well, gets us mired in very difficult situations, can result in us being drawn in to very expensive, difficult, costly interventions that actually breed more resentment in the region. we have to think through strategically what is
for the the cup. abc7 news reporter lilian kim is live at the america's cup park. hi, lilian. >> ama, two sailing power houses will be facing off in less than two weeks. it is not really a surprise, but fans are excited nonetheless. >> it is a clean start. >> em rete's team new zealand faced off against the luna rosa for the final time. in the end the kimi came out ahead as they had for most of the series. team new zealand now advances to the premiere event, the america's cup where they will take on the defending champion or cal team usa. they stressed how important it is for them to win. >> one thing my dad told me was never to start a speech with an apology. the only reason we are in san francisco is to take the cup away. >> relations have been tense for quite some time. things got worse in recent weeks when team new zealand accused oracle of cheating after it modified its boats during warm up races. sailing enthusiasts say it will be a good match up. >> i think they will put up a good fight. >> i think oracle has their work cut out for them to be sure. but we always have to root for the americ
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
stains. ♪ >>> america just can't compete in this connected world without a super fast information highway. that's why the government has set aside billions to upgrade the nation's internet service. >> but abc's david kerley found $1 million wasted in a single closet in west virginia on the washington watch dog beat. [ modem handshaking ] >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: the to spread broadband the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. but take a look at this -- these boxes stacked up in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers, you paid for them $20,000 each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. $1.25 million in this closet gathering dust for nearly three years now. enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned other spendin
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
worse. the pace of decline of america's middle class has actually speeded up in the obama years. median income down 4.4% since june of '09. >> so he accelerated income ee quality. >> he increased it. we're going to watch varney and company on friday. the friday edition is always the best and often ends in song. >> it is? >> yes. >> there's a promo. >> thanks, everyone. >>> this guy says black people can't survive unless a lot of whites are killed. and guess what? he works for the department of homeland security. so why hasn't he been fired? a former department of justice employee says he knows and he's going to join us next. >>> and barely even back to school, just beginning to look like christmas at some stores. what the heck is happening? we'll tell you why this year is different and starting much earlier. >> oh, no. ♪ so then the little tiny chipmunks go all the way up... ♪ [ female announcer ] when your swapportunity comes, take it. ♪ what? what? what? [ female announcer ] yoplait. it is so good. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, what? what? relief is at han
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
intervention. it believes the rebels will not support america's interest if they were to come to power now. this came out to a letter that general dempsey sent. he said the military is clearly taking out the syrian air force and shifting the balance. michigan republican congressman justin amash held a town hall meeting recently in michigan. he touched on topics like health care and government surveillance. he offered an amendment that would bar the and as a from collecting phone and data records from citizens who are not subject of investigation. the amendment was opposed by speaker john boehner and the white house and ultimately defeated. his town hall back in michigan lasted about one hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. ben, he is my chief of staff. he does not just work for me. he is primarily in our grand rapids office, and you can find that on my website, and we have a satellite office in battle creek, so if there is something you would like to schedule, you can contact our grand rapids office, and we will make sure we will have someone to meet with you as well. jordan
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
not? >> got to go in. >> come on rob, get it in there to get three points. >> one point. >> america is still learning the beautiful game. >> that will help. >> coming up next, economist dr. jeffe jeffery sacks joins us and bill bratton and nbc political director chuck todd. >> chuck winked at you. >> oh, god. >> wink again. >> the winker. >> he just did. >> and, of course, the great andrea mitchell. >> she's great. >> "morning joe" back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for
of america, of giving asylum to edward snowden, the president absolutely cannot go to a bilateral conversation with vladimir putin. >> so there's always a little moment for me, when condi rice and president obama are on the same policy page that always makes me want to pause and say, let's talk about that. do you agree? >> absolutely. i think the reset was great. they got as much out of it as you could. they got the start treaty, the transit route to afghanistan through russia, but then, things started to kind of go sour around the time of libya. the russians felt duped. they had abstained from vetoing at the security council. they couldn't vote in favor of it, but they abstained and felt the u.s. did a lot more than they said they were going to do. on their watch, qaddafi was killed. and the ambassador was harassed for months on the ground, in a very unprofessional, very sort of, this is not what states do to each other. and it went on from there. syria was a major irritant. and what you heard from the white house during this period was like, look, if you guys don't want to talk,
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
out, the united states of america. our mandate is to report the truth, not what the pio tells us is the truth. even what the cio thinks is the truth. the truth as we can find it. whether it is the time of an easter egg hunt or a national policy. it's america, the land of the free, the land of the free press. and the people that we serve, the people that we are a conduit for, the public of the united states of america has a right to this information. thank you. >> thank you. tony? [laughter] >> it's funny, whenever we have these constitutions, and is they actually happen a lot, you know, i think we look at them in one of two ways. one we just heard, right, is that the public affairs officers are pretty much, you know, obstacles and ill-informed boobs, and reporters are universeally good and have the interest of the public at heart. or it's the opposite, right? is that, you know, reporters are evil scoundrels looking to embarrass public officials and make mockery of the policy making process, and the only thing standing between this evil horde and the print are public affairs offic
'll be leaving my job and heading back to congress. >> his head band say good tell, he's got america on his mind, literally. >>> but first for you this morning, breaking news, there is chaos in egypt, deadly clashes overnight between government security forces and supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. these clashes have left 15 dead, more than 200 injured and those numbers are expected to rise. cnn is covering this story like no other network can, with live team coverage. first let's go to arwa damon, live in the streets of cairo, joining us by phone. arwa, can you hear us? if so, what's the latest? >> reporter: well these clashes are really spreading throughout the entire capital. we were outside around an hour ago when we last talk, the main sit-in site, watching pro-morsi demonstrators, crowds using a bus for cover, trying to move forward on an overpass to join those demonstrators that are at the main sit-in site. now we're in another part of cairo where we saw tear gassing, what sounded like gunshots. this is another area where there is a fairly large crowd of pro-morsi demonstrators
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
: every day more americans choose abc news, america's number one n it makes me feel happy and excited because i have a mentor in my life. it makes me feel good because i know i am helping someone. the first time i seen her smile, i knew it was gonna be a better year and a better day. she has changed my life, now i can be whatever i want to. she taught me never to give up, and i never will. mentoring works, become a mentor. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- moral obscenity. that's what the secretary of state is calling syria's alleged use of deadly chemical weapons. could the u.s. be on the brink of taking military action? >> fierce fire fight. monstrous storm of flames burning to yosemite national forest. the race to stop the fire from destroying ancient trees and polluting drinking water supplies. >> we never know the way the fires come up around here when they're going to overtake you. so safety first. >> a progress report as 4,000 homes and businesses are in harm's way. >> then watch out increased risk of walking while texting and talking on the phone. a killer combination. >
desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
. their time. it was bank of america's time before and now it is one of the moments when i look back at my own career and i realize that i had a choice, goldman sachs coming out of harvard law or paul weiss. i took goldman, but it is a paul weiss moment. law firm. i'm going law firm. >> you covered a lot of this when you talked to jamie here on the very floor a few weeks ago. >> yes. >> take a look at this bite. >> this company did great through the crisis, and we trade around the world and trade tr trillions of dollars everyday. we are a good company with flaws. >> you are used past tense. >> yes, there is some compliance and some mortgage and some industry-wide and some unique to us, ap when nd when we looked ae said they were accurate complaints. so we acknowledge the faults and we will fix them. we are not denying it, and we will fix them and make the regulators happy with what we are doing. >> look, a lot of blame to go around and a lot of people hate the bankers, and do you read the store ri and say, boy, i feel bad for jpmorgan and dimon, wow, what a shame. no, you don't. they are big t
the field. the humiliating public verdict playing out before all of america. >>> and oprah reportedly reaching out to lindsay lohan just hours before the embattled star was going to take off for a european vacation. the queen of talk steps in. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning, i'm brianna keeler in for carol costello. and a small pennsylvania community that provided itself on never being in the headlines is finding itself in the middle of a tragic story this morning. police say a man with an 18-year-old grudge against ross township officials killed three people at a town council meeting in pennsylvania last night. this is about 70 miles north of philadelphia, and witnesses say that rockne newell started firing even before he entered the building. once inside, the gunman sprayed more bullets, then left and came back with another gun. the nightmare didn't stop until he was tackled and shot. >> they absolutely would have saved lives. he was entering the building again with a handgun and certainly his intent had been shown that he was wanting to harm the people and certainly if the
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